Legal Information in a Background Check

Background Checks. Although the word may seem scary, this is not something to be feared. In fact, it’s a normal part of life, and at some point everybody will have a background check done on them. There are a multitude of reasons why a background check could be done reasons varying from a new job, before moving into a new apartment or condominium and more. And although you have no control what appears on the background check report (your history is your past, and there’s very little you can do to change the past), you do have the right to protect your privacy by knowing what is legal and what is not legal information on a background check report.

A background check usually contains a lot of different information. Most of the information is compliant with the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) but sometimes you may find information that seems either out of place or unnecessary. There are people that legally can have all the information, for example, any jobs involving the government, FBI or police. In those cases, the government is allowed to know all information because it is in regards to national safety. In all other cases where the government is not involved, access to that information is denied. An important step to ensuring your privacy is by asking what information is requested on the background check. If the employer or renter (or whomever) gives an unclear answer or disregards the question all together, have them write down exactly what information they are looking for. That way, if something on the background check shows up that was not originally communicated; you are able to take the appropriate steps to clear things up.

Every company has different policies on what information they need. The general standard check can include any or all of the following; felony and misdemeanor arrest and conviction charges, education and professional license verifications, employment checks, social security verifications, sexual offender checks, motor vehicle reports, federal criminal checks, reference checks, civil litigation, OIG database, federal bankruptcy and many others. There is also an industry standard to how long this information can be used for hire. The FCRA also states that a company can go back seven years for hire. Any older information is declared illegal and must be discarded.

If by some off chance you do end up finding information there are steps you can take. The best step is to have a conversation with the other party, and for the most part, any problem that you may have can be solved easily. Furthermore, if the problem still hasn’t been solved, try consulting a lawyer. If the information provided is old and past the seven year scope, there is legal action that can be taken.

When a company or person requires a background check it is important to know your rights regarding your privacy. If you suspect that there is illegal information on your background check report, there actions you can take so that you are protected.

The Duties of a Personal Injury Lawyer

Have you been hurt on the job? Have you experienced an injury because of the actions of another? These are simply two of the easiest and simplest examples of when you would need to contact a personal injury lawyer to file a claim for you and begin the legal process towards compensation. If you are looking for a lawyer that deals with personal injury, you want to look at the law school they have graduated from and whether or not they are BAR certified. Further, you will want to examine whether the lawyer belongs to a number of different national or local legal associations.

In addition to looking at the specific qualifications of your lawyer, you want to decide what kind of practice as a whole that you want to take your case. This can be anything ranging from a small personal practice to a massive legal conglomerate. Depending upon your needs and financial resources, different avenues of representation is advised.

A lawyer that works for individual injury issues is the advocate of the client to obtain just compensation for the harms that had been inflicted upon the client. These lawyers work confidentially to obtain just financial recourse from those that have injured you. Simply, they get you money to compensate you for your harm.

Lawyers that specialize in injury have the same minimal requirements that other lawyers have. A lawyer must pass a written bar exam so that they can practice law. These bar exams differ widely by state and a lawyer must have passed the exam for the state in which they practice.

To take a bar exam, a lawyer must have attended some form of law school and received a law degree. Further, lawyers that specialize in personal injury are also required to take a multistate bar exam, a multistate essay exam and a multistate professional responsibility exam. Even after passing all of these exams, lawyers are still required to remain knowledgeable about the most recent changes in legal precedent especially within their field of practice. This is accomplished by taking continuing legal education courses as well as by performing legal research.

A lawyer will chose to operate within a specific area of the law. By creating a focus, lawyers gain additional knowledge and special experience. A lawyer must take a specialty certification program that has been accredited by the American Bar Association in order to be a certified specialist in personal injury law. These certification help set high standards for knowledge, experience and competence, so finding a certified lawyer that specializes in personal injury law is a primary goal.

Another way to access the value and qualifications of your injury lawyer are looking at the professional associations that they belong to. This includes the American Bar Association, a legal association that works to continue legal education and provides accreditation for law schools.

There is also the Association of Personal Injury Lawyers and the Association of Trial Lawyers of America. Membership in these legal associations is a great indicator of the value of your lawyer.

SUV Rollovers – Legal Information

SUV (Sport Utility Vehicles) sales have sky-rocketed in the United States over the past few years. In 2004, SUV’s accounted for 25 percent of all new-vehicle sales with over 22 million on the road. Because SUV’s are larger, and heavier than other cars, buyers often times overlook the safety issues concerning them. Unfortunately, SUV’s have the leading cause of rollover death on our highways. New statistics show that more than 12,000 people died last year in rollover accidents with SUV’s accounting for 62 percent.

In the US, SUV sales are rising and so are the problems that come along with them. Because SUV’s have a higher center of gravity, they are the most unstable and rollover-prone vehicles on the road today. Many SUV’s are designed to be driven off-road, however very few are equipped with proper equipment such as roll bars. In addition, only a few meet the National Highway Traffic and Safety Administration roof safety standards.

If you or someone that you know has been the victim of an SUV rollover you should seek help immediately. An experienced accident lawyer can help you understand the complex legal system to ensure that you receive the compensation you deserve. Don’t let legal time constraints impede or terminate your case before it happens. Contact a lawyer immediately!